How to make a lighweight roll-up trug

How to make a crochet string and willow lightweight trug

Collecting bundles of long-stemmed plants or flowers can be awkward, especially if you need to carry them any distance and don’t want to break the stems. If the plants in question are Stinging Nettles, then that makes collecting them even more difficult.

I collect both nettles and Comfrey in Spring or early Summer as I use them to make plant food. I will also be collecting a quantity of nettles fairly soon for a fibre art project I’m working on. Thinking about the practicalities of these tasks this year led to me designing and constructing a basic, lightweight and readily portable trug suitable for my long-stemmed-plant-carrying activities.

Completed trug in use
My trug with a small load of Comfrey and nettle … its first outing

In recent months I’ve had a bit of a ‘thing’ about crafting in willow and jute, so I had some of these natural materials to hand with which to try out my trug-making. I thought I’d share this little project with you. The design I’ve created is very simple and could be made in other, or more sturdy materials, as suits the purpose of your trug.

The Materials I used

15 Willow rods (I selected the rods so they were all approximately the same pencil thickness with 2 slightly thicker ones at each end)
Ruler/tape measure
Secateurs/knife
Jute garden string
Thick cotton string
Size 5.00 crochet hook

Making the trug

Completed trug opened out
The complete trug – folded out so you can see the overall construction

1. Firstly, I trimmed the thinner tips of the willow rods so that they were all about 1 metre (39 inches) long.

2. I arranged the willow rods, making sure they were all parallel with each other and about 5cm (2 inches) apart.

3. Using the cotton string and the crochet hook, I carefully crocheted across the willow rods 7.5cm (3 inches) to the right of the centre of the rod, making sure I kept the rods the same distance from each other, working 6 crochet chains between willow rods and keeping the rods parallel lengthways too. To secure each rod I crocheted around it with one chain in each direction, before continuing with my crochet chain across to the next rod.

4. When I’d crocheted right across all of the 15 willow rods, I created a carrying handle 20cm (8 inches) long. With my thick cotton string I worked 21 crochet chains for the handle.

Trug close-up, showing crochet for handle and rods
A closer view of one of the trug handles. You can also see more clearly how I have crocheted around the willow rods.

5. Next I crocheted back across the willow rods, 15cm (6 inches) away from first row, (that’s 7.5cm / 3 inches to the left of the centre of the rods) again keeping the rods the same distance from each other by working 6 crochet chains between the rods.

6. When I’d completed this second row of crochet, I created the second carrying handle on the opposite edge of the trug, in the same way as the first handle.

7. I carefully secured the end of the string to ensure the handle stays firmly attached.

A closer view of the position of the rows of jute and cotton crochet that hold the trug together
A closer view of the position of the rows of jute and cotton crochet that hold the trug together

8. To complete the trug I worked a second row of crochet on each side. I placed these outer rows of crochet 18cm (7 inches) from the first and, this time, I worked my crochet in green jute garden string. Again I fastened off the yarn securely.

Holding the empty trug
Holding the empty trug – you can see it balances quite evenly on its handles

… and that was my trug completed. I have used it a couple of times so far for carrying Comfrey and Stinging Nettles and I found it worked just as I’d hoped for my needs. To roll it up, I simply hold the handles and gather together the willow rods then secure it by tying a piece of string around each end.

Lightweight trug, rolled and tied
My lightweight trug, rolled and tied at one end … tied at both ends and it is easy to carry by its own handles

I am thinking of making a tougher one – ready for Autumn – using hazel rods. I will use it for carrying willow rods or other heavier woody materials.

J Peggy Taylor

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