Digging garden soil and a robin

Dig, weed, plant, grow

“Would you like to do a bit of the garden?” an elderly neighbour asked us one day last Summer. And so it was that we ended up taking on the wildly overgrown part of a large allotment garden.

Overgrown_garden
That’s our overgrown patch on the left

When I say, “taking on”, I mean that literally! It needed some serious taming! Slowly but surely, over the Autumn and Winter, a garden gradually emerged out of the wilderness. Another neighbour joked that we’d probably find lions and tigers in there. We didn’t, of course! But we did find toads and frogs sheltering in the damp jungle of densely packed thistles, nettles, bramble and willowherb.

We also found an old robin’s nest in an old blackcurrant bush. We found a small wall beside a lovely old red brick path and we found the remains of a Victorian greenhouse, complete with its own grapevine … with black grapes 😉

Garden paths were gradually relieved of their bindweed carpets and the unkempt tresses of berry-laden brambles were relieved of their luscious harvest before being shorn back closer to the boundary fence. I am a keen forager of wild fruit, so this collection of captive bramble bushes will be tamed and treasured for future fruit-picking.

Digging over an allotment garden
Digging and weeding

Then the digging began. My husband heroically tackled the heaviest digging, battling bravely against giant bramble roots. I took on the forest of Himalayan Balsam, capturing as many of the spring-loaded seed heads as I could, before they launched their invasive cargoes of seeds back into the garden.

Sweet peas and a bracken mulch

Eventually, our sections of the garden were dug over and weeded, ready for Spring planting. Though, we ended up having rather more time than we’d anticipated as Spring was rather reluctant to arrive. I’d planted out my early potatoes during a mild spell in early April – which is quite a normal time for planting early potatoes. A fortnight later, I was hurrying out to collect bracken to use as a warming mulch to protect my poor potatoes from the snow!

Early potato plants growing on allotment garden
My early potato plants are starting to grow

Happily, I can say that my mulch did its job well and the potatoes are now growing merrily.

I have a little ‘garden friend’ who follows me slavishly whenever I have a spade in my hand. A robin! Eagle-eyed visitors may be able to spot him in my header image at the top of this post.

I do have more garden tales to share, but I’ll save them for another day …

J Peggy Taylor

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4 thoughts on “Dig, weed, plant, grow

  1. Yes, there he is, the robin!
    So much hard work! Great job, Peggy!
    Looking forward to see your growing potato plants 🙂
    Best wishes…
    Tc, keep smiling 🙂

    1. 😀 Ah yes, the robin is my friend 😀 It is indeed hard work, Sindhu … but I think it’s going to be rewarding! I’ll be posting again soon about my plants 🙂

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