Living History Events for Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge

Our family’s home education journey has taken us to many events over the years. One type of event that has always proved very popular with our boys is Living History. Here in North East England, the Romans, the Vikings, and the English Civil Wars have all played their significant parts in our local history.

We have enjoyed some wonderful learning opportunities at Living History days at museums and Roman forts around the North East. We’ve met people dressed in authentic costumes of the era and learned all about the lives of the people they represent. As a parent, I have found this kind of ‘hands on’ approach has really brought the history alive for our boys. For Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge this week on the topic of ‘Events’, I thought I’d share with you a few photos of some of these Living History events.

Children having fun at a Roman history day
Young trainee gladiators learning their moves at Arbeia Roman Fort, South Shields

That’s my young gladiator, second from the right πŸ˜‰

Tablet weaving at Viking living history event, Great North Museum, Newcastle upon Tyne
Tablet weaving demonstration at a Viking living history event, Great North Museum, Newcastle upon Tyne

Another thing we have found with the participants on Living History days, is their generosity with their time and knowledge. We talked to this lady for ages about her Viking tablet weaving. It was fascinating to see how the different patterns were made.

Musket-loading demonstration at English Civil War living history event
How to load your musket – English Civil War living history at Segedunum Roman Fort, Wallsend

Our boys took a close interest in how to load a musket at this English Civil War living history event held at the Segedunum Roman Fort, Wallsend in Summer 2010. Later in the same Summer we saw muskets and Civil War artillery in action at the re-enactment of the Battle of Hylton Castle.

Sunderland’s Hylton Castle was the scene of this important English Civil War battle in March 1664. The rivalry between the North East cities of Newcastle and Sunderland is legendary, especially in terms of football. Back in 1644, things were no different! Newcastle supported the Royalists and Sunderland were on the side of the Parliamentarians.

The Parliamentarians really needed to win the Battle of Hylton Castle to keep the port of Sunderland out of Royalist hands. The Parliamentarians did win which meant the port of Sunderland was also able to continue to supply their allies, the Scottish Covenanters, which in turn meant that the Scottish Covenanters were properly supplied for the pivotal Battle of Marston Moor on 2nd July 1644 – the largest battle ever to take place on English soil.

Battle of Hylton Castle - English Civil War battle re-enactment
Battle of Hylton Castle – English Civil War battle re-enactment

This large-scale re-enactment was organised by the Sealed Knot re-enactment group and a very dramatic battle it was too, with musketeers, pikemen and field artillery. The armies marched to the beat of their drums. The smell of gun smoke filled the air as the musketeers lined up and fired off their muskets and the field cannons were loaded. “Have a care!” they called out, before,”Boom!” the cannons were fired off too. The sturdy pikemen in their steel helmets clashed pikes in noisy groups on the battle field. The ‘injured’ were tended by the female camp followers.

As well as the battle re-enactment itself, there was also a large living history encampment with demonstrations of food, entertainments and various skills and crafts of the time. We spent the whole day at this event, exploring the living history encampment, watching the dramatic battle and soaking up the atmosphere among the crowds of people who had come along to experience the Battle of Hylton Castle.

Do take a look at the events others have shared for Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge this week.

J Peggy Taylor

Cee's Fun Foto Challenge Badge

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10 thoughts on “Living History Events for Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge

  1. Rich went to the 180th anniversary reenactment of the Battle of Waterloo. It became the inspiration for the third Jaspa’s Journey book.

      1. It was. The castle was destroyed by the Royalists when in possession and about to be beaten by the Roundheads, so the enemy could not use it. Later the stone was plundered by builders, such as those who built the wall round our house.

      2. Ah, real military tactics! But how interesting, having such historic stones around your house! That happened with Hadrian’s Wall too – it was made into Hexham Abbey!

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