Tag Archives: black and white landscapes

Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge: Moving Water

Waterfall on a woodland stream in black and white
Woodland stream waterfall

From busy streams (or ‘burns’ as we call them in our northern corner of England 😉 ) …

To white-topped waves …

Moving water has such a power to mesmerise us and hold our thoughts.

Sometimes peacefully babbling, sometimes an angry torrent, our favourite woodland stream is an old friend and always has something to say.

White water waves and cliffs at Marsden Bay
White waves at Marsden Bay

And then the sea …

How many hours have been whiled away gazing at the sea? I wonder. I know I will have added a few to that total myself.

Gently restless lapping on a sunny shore or foaming wild waters, crashing against cliffs, the sea always speaks of journeys – real or imagined – to far away places or just along the shoreline.

For more moving water images, do take a look at what others have posted for Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge this week.

Peggy

Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge: Ground

Magnesian limestone and sand at Trow Point, South Shields - b-w image
Magnesian limestone and sand at Trow Point, South Shields

For Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge this week, we are looking at the ground. I often find the ground quite interesting because it is full of history.

The first image I’ve chosen shows an example of the Concretionary Magnesian Limestone on our North East England coastline. If you’re a geologist, you’ll certainly have heard of this well-known rock formation. The rocks were formed during the Permian period, over 250 million years ago, after rising sea levels flooded the adjacent sand dunes. The UK was still part of a large landmass at that time and lay just north of the equator. I always find it fascinating that we can just look down at the ground and look back so far into pre-history.

Another aspect of this particular spot that always strikes me as we walk across it, is the contrasts in texture. The sand is smooth, soft and usually cool, as the rising tide is normally casting its white foamy fingers across it. The Concretionary Magnesian Limestone is, by contrast, very rough. It really does look like concrete, with lumps of stone set into it, created entirely by the forces of Nature without any human help.

Stoney Road - surface - b-w image
The road surface gives the Stoney Road its name

My second image is of the old road that runs through our woods. It still retains its old surface of local sandstone gravel, though some parts have been reinforced with newer limestone. Unsurprisingly, this road is known as the Stoney Road and a hundred years ago was the main road linking our village to a neighbouring one. We often walk along the old road when we go into the woods, to see the carpets of bluebells in Spring or the carpets of leaves in Autumn but it is also a cool green tunnel in high Summer. I’m sure this old road would have many tales to tell, if only the ground could talk!

Do take a look at the ground with other entrants in Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge this week – there are some wonderful shots to see.

J Peggy Taylor

Weather in black and white

Weather in black and white ~ cloudscape
Cumulus cloudscape

We certainly experience lots of weather up here on our hillside overlooking the valley. Fascinating cloudscapes are a regular feature of our landscape. I love cloud-watching – I could watch them for hours. Big fluffy cumulus clouds often fill our Summer skies. I loved the light and shadow patterns falling on this cloudscape from the evening sun as the clouds sailed off over the woods. We sometimes spot dragons or dogs or mice chasing through the cumulus as it coasts across the sky. One day last Summer, an elderly neighbour pointed out a peacock with its tail feathers streaming out behind. It’s amazing what we can find in the clouds.

Weather in black and white - snowy sunshine
Snowy sunshine

The low Winter sun is behind me in this photo, shining across the snow-covered meadow and up to the houses on the hill. I love the way the sun catches the undulations in the soft foreground snow – it reminds me of warmer days on sunny beaches.

Weather in black and white - raindrops in the river
Raindrops in the river

We often complain about rain here in England, but a rainy day Springtime walk through the woods to the river is an absolute joy to the senses. The delicious earthy smell of wet woods combines with the sweet scents of rising sap and trees in flower. The rain awakens the river from its sleepy state and stirs it into urgent action. I love to watch the patterns in the swirling water and here the falling raindrops add their own perfect circles on the surface of the river.

Weather in black and white ~ misty day in the woods
Misty day in the woods

Mist lends an air of mystery to our everyday landscapes. Our regular walk through the beechwood looks so different when the woods are cloaked in mist. I also find, with our view being shortened, it makes us focus more on those things close at hand that we can still see clearly, so sometimes we spot things we might otherwise have missed. We gaze into the murky distance and our imaginations create all kinds of imaginary shapes that vanish into the mist when we walk nearer. Misty day walks can be creatively inspiring, stirring ideas that lurk shrouded in mist in our mind’s eye.

You can find more weather photos in black and white in Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge this week.

J Peggy Taylor

Beautiful places for Cee’s Black and White Challenge

View to the Pennine moors - black & white
Our breathtaking view to the Pennine moors … especially after we’ve climbed the hill 😉

A Summer's day at the river- black & white
A beautiful place to relax – a Summer’s day by the river

“What is beautiful to you?” is the theme of Cee’s Black and White Challenge this week. There were probably so many things I could have chosen, but I decided to choose two of the landscapes that provide us with endless pleasure through the year’s seasonal cycle. The first photo is our beautiful, everyday view to the North Pennine moors, and the second is a regular rambling haunt that we love so much, down by the river. Whether we walk uphill or down – we are always certain of a beautiful view.

J Peggy Taylor