Tag Archives: Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge

Spring Shadows for Cee’s Black and White Challenge

02 Spring shadows in black and white
Spring shadows among the trees

As sometimes happens, I was browsing through some images looking for something entirely different when I spotted these two images I took when we were taking one of our regular woodland walks a few weeks ago.

01 Spring shadows in black and white
Spring shadows on the woodland floor

The woods looked beautiful in their new Spring greens but what really struck me was the way the leaves and trees were casting their shadows in the bright afternoon sun. It was quite mesmerising to watch.

Cee has given us an open theme for her Black and White Photo Challenge this week so I thought I’d share my Spring shadows with you.

Do take a look at what others have found for Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge this week.

J Peggy Taylor

Old railway truck - flanged wheels

Wheels for Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge

When I saw this week’s theme of ‘Wheels’ for Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge, I remembered the fascinating wheels on the old railway trucks in our woods. I’ve posted about the wheels on the old coal trucks before, but for the challenge I decided to re-imagine these iron flanged wheels in black and white.

Railway truck wheels in black and white
The railway truck’s flanged wheels rode cleverly on the rail. You can also see some of the braking mechanism between the wheels.
Flanged wheels in black and white
In this close-up shot of the flanged wheel you can see some of the elaborate engineering involved on the coal truck wheels

I think black and white captures the aged engineering of these old work horses quite well.

You can find more interpretations of wheels in black and white in Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge this week.

J Peggy Taylor

Bluebells in woodland

My Favourite Things for Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge

“When the dog bites, when the bee stings, when I’m feeling sad,
I simply remember my favourite things,
And then I don’t feel so bad.”

For Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge this week Cee has chosen the chorus of “My Favourite Things” as the theme. I’ve decided to share some of my favourite things that I have posted here on my blog during my first year-and-a-bit of blogging.

My regular blog visitors may have spotted my new blog header – beechwoods in Springtime are a great favourite of mine and we love to walk in the woods and enjoy the sights, sounds and smells of Spring. For my post header image I have chosen one of my very favourite Spring flowers, bluebells. I posted about the “Beautiful Bluebells!” in our woods last Spring.

Carder Bee feeding on Common Knapweed
Bee-on-a-flower – a Carder Bee feeding on Common Knapweed

I’m glad to say we’ve never experienced bee stings while spending happy warm Summer hours watching and photographing bees on flowers.

Comma butterfly on thistles
Comma butterfly on thistles

Butterflies are another Summertime favourite of mine. I love the orange of the Comma butterfly against the purple of their favourite food, the thistle flowers.

The cool green tranquility of the river
The cool green tranquility of the river

Here in Northern England we experience all kinds of weather conditions and we have learned to enjoy them all. A rainy day at the river in Spring is always an uplifting experience – you can read my post about this wet woodland walk here.

The old railway path and railway bridge in the woods where we often walk. I think in this misty shot it looks like something from a Victorian mystery story!
The old railway path and railway bridge in the woods where we often walk. This railway was a mineral line carrying coal from local mines. I think in this misty shot it looks like something from a Victorian mystery story!

The old railway path through the woods is a path we have seen in all weathers, from sunny days to Winter snow. The Victorian railway bridge has featured several times on my blog especially as part of my great interest in history in the landscape. The image above is the bridge in colour from my post, “Old rail trails and a bear hunt”, and below it is in black and white for “Victorian railway bridges in black and white”.

Both of these posts were for Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge, which has been my favourite weekly photo challenge here on WordPress. It was from creating the black and white images for the Victorian bridges post that kindled in me an ambition to try my hand at creating more black and white images and taking part in Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge. I do enjoy taking part in the photo challenges and learning from others.

Victorian rural railway bridge in snow monochrome
Victorian rural railway bridge in our local woods
Pastel pink wild roses scrambling over the hedge
Pastel pink wild roses scrambling over the hedge

Wild roses are another of my very favourite flowers. I think I’ve probably said before, I have different favourite flowers depending on the season – there’s always something to look forward too … or in this case, look back at, after the Summer was done and the cooler days of Autumn were with us. I love my son’s photo of the wild Dog Roses. The roses appeared in my “Pastel pink wild roses” post last October.

Blooming Purple Crocuses
Blooming Purple Crocuses

Purple crocuses with their bright orange stamens are one of my favourite early Spring flowers. These one are in one of my back yard pots along with daffodils and some seedlings of one of our ‘wild’ edible leaves, Garlic Mustard. You can see more about my back yard gardening in “My Blooming Back Yard”.

First salad seedlings 2014
First salad seedlings of 2014 on my window ledge

As well as gardening outside in my yard, I also love indoor gardening too and I grow salad leaves and herbs on my window ledges. In the above photo are my first seedlings of last year – a favourite moment in my gardening year. Just today I was photographing my first salad leaf seedlings of 2015.

Juicy fresh raspberries for a delicious dessert
Juicy fresh raspberries for a delicious dessert

A Summer delight for me is picking wild fruit. These delicious raspberries grow in a small patch of woodland not far from our house.

Pink Sweet Peas on willow garden screen

Last Summer I had fun with an interesting vertical gardening experiment in my back yard. I made a jute and willow garden screen and then grew Sweet Peas in air-pruning plant pots to grow on the screen. I shared a number of posts about this project on the willow screen, the air-pruning pots and the Sweet Pea flowers. I was so pleased when my Sweet Peas finally flowered!

Crochet patch and new crochet edging on my jumper
The new crochet border in spike stitch

I couldn’t post about my favourite things without including a crochet project or two. The jute and willow garden screen was crocheted and my recent “Mending a Woolly Jumper Craft Project” involved several types of crochet too.

Turning a shirt collar - before and after
Turning a shirt collar – before and after

Turning a shirt collar is one of those old-fashioned mending tasks that I have always done to extend the life of favourite shirts. The shirt that features in my “Turn a shirt collar” tutorial belongs to my son. He is very fond of this shirt so when the collar began to wear, there was only one thing for me to do …

I decided to post a tutorial on the collar turning process and it has certainly been a favourite among my blog visitors – it is one of the most visited pages on my blog.

A colourful October dawn

To complete my collection of favourites, I want to close with one of my very favourite things, a beautiful sunrise. I am lucky to see a lot of beautiful sunrises and I often share them in my Wordless Wednesday posts. You can see more of my sunrises if you click on the Wordless Wednesday tag on my tag cloud in the sidebar … a beautiful sunrise doesn’t really need many words does it?

I’ve had a lot of fun strolling through my blog photos choosing my favourite things – and I must say I have had to leave out a few too or this post would have gone on forever! Do take a look at what others have chosen for Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge this week for the chorus of “My Favourite Things”.

022414-feature-banner

J Peggy Taylor

Textures in black and white - Scots Pine bark

Textures for Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge

Textures appeal to our sense of touch as well as creating interest visually. I love natural materials and for Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge this week I am sharing some of my favourite natural textures with you.

My header image shows the heavily textured bark of a Scots Pine tree. Tree bark is wonderful for touchable texture with different species providing us with everything from rough to smooth. This Scots Pine tree stands on one of our regular woodland paths so we can enjoy its textured bark as we pass by.

Textures in black and white - medieval stonework
Medieval stonework

In our part of the country sandstone forms one of the geological layers and was used as a building material of choice for many centuries. The stone was normally quarried very locally to where it was needed, though often not much ‘quarrying’ would have been needed as there are many sandstone outcrops from where it would have been readily available. The sandstone in my photo has been hewn into large blocks and built into this fortified medieval manor house. Sandstone is another wonderfully touchable texture. For me, its rough surface speaks solidity and security.

Textures in black and white - decaying log
Decaying log

Wood can have so many textures during its lifespan. In this decaying log the solid wood is gradually being broken down into soft and crumbly fibres. As it is decaying, the log provides us with lots of visual textures.

Textures in black and white - frosty bracken
Frosty bracken

In Summer when we are out on a ramble and want a comfortable seat for our picnic lunch, we will often make bracken ‘cushions’ to sit on. As the year draws on into Autumn, the bracken turns brown and by Winter it lies on the ground like a cosy patterned blanket keeping the earth warm. In my image the light picks out the fronds of bracken that have been painted white with frost.

Textures in black and white - seaweed and limpets on rock
Seaweed and limpets on the rocks

Seashore environments can exhibit a wonderful mixture of textures. Our North East coastline certainly provides a lot of interest through its flora and fauna and in its Magnesian Limestone rocks and geological features. The rocky coastline in itself has plenty of exciting visual texture but getting up close to some of those seashore rocks reveals more temptingly touchable textures … such as this smooth and leathery Knotted Wrack seaweed with its bumpy air bladders that clings to the rough limestone rock alongside the resting limpets hiding in their ridged shells and clamped firmly on the rocky surface waiting for the swish of the returning tide before they venture forth to feed.

Textures in black and white - fungus gills
A worm’s eye view of fungus gills

To complete my texture tour I wanted to include a couple of my son’s images of fungi textures. He likes to be quite creative in his photography, so he often chooses unusual angles. I love the way he has managed to capture the texture in this worm’s eye view of the gills underneath the cap of this fungus.

Textures in black and white - ear fungus on elder branch
Jelly Ear Fungus on elder branch

Jelly Ear Fungus is a strange and fascinating fungus that we find growing on elder trees. When this fungus is freshly grown it is pliable with a slightly squishy texture and a soft downy covering. Its shape is often reminiscent of an ear with prominent veins … though perhaps an ear from some alien life form rather than a human!

To explore more textures please do take a look at Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge this week.

J Peggy Taylor

country lane in black and white

Roadscapes for Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge

Roads form the physical connections between our human settlements – towns, cities, villages or even single houses. Most of us use roads every day as a vital means of communication.

In our area, many of our modern roads can trace their history to a web of tracks that took our ancestors from A to B for all their various purposes, from collecting food and fuel to marching to war. I find old maps are a fascinating source of detail on the places visited by people in the past and the roads that took them there. We can often see how busier routes developed and others fell into disuse as settlements changed according to the needs of their inhabitants or sometimes due to other external factors.

The road in my header image climbs to the top of the hill from our village as it connects our valley to the Tyne valley to the north. In Summer we like to walk up here to admire the view from the hilltop. On a clear day we can see as far north as the Scottish border and a good few miles south too, across the North Pennines. As quite a busy route, this road has gradually been resurfaced and widened over the years. Originally, around 400 years ago, this section of the road would have been a track leading from the village squire’s grand hall up to an adjoining hilltop road that linked to other significant properties nearby.

Old road through the woods in snow - black and white
Cold and snowy but still well-trodden – the old road through our woods

It may be snowy but the old road through our woods is always a very popular route. This single track road used to be the main road that linked our village to other villages nearby and it is still well-used for this purpose though it is no longer the main road traffic route. Its route travels over the Victorian railway bridge that I’ve written about previously. In 2002 the road was closed to road traffic and adopted by the Forestry Commision. To preserve the old stone bridge, use of the road is now restricted to walkers, cyclists and horse riders, with vehicles being restricted to essential access only.

Road to our rural village in black and white
The main road into our village provides amazing views across the Derwent valley

The main road into our village drops down from the north east, twisting and turning as it goes. Here is one of those turns as the road suddenly lurches rightwards along the valley side. Driving towards our village along this road, it is at this point the whole vista of the valley comes suddenly into view. Impressive cloudscapes, Winter sunsets or just many layers of grey in a classic demonstration of aerial perspective draw the eye south westwards through the river valley. This photograph is taken from the ‘end’ of the old road through the woods that I showed you above. The route heading right in this image links the two adjacent villages and developed into a main route sometime in the late 19th century – the same time as coal mining became a prominent industry in the area which created increased transport needs in itself as well as via an increased population.

Clockburn Lonnen ford over the River Derwent in black and white
An ancient road – Clockburn Lonnen ford over the River Derwent

This river ford is part of another interesting old road in our valley. The old road that crosses the River Derwent here is known as Clockburn Lonnen – lonnen is a local dialect word for ‘lane’. In the past this lane formed part of the main route from the cathedral city of Durham to Scotland and I believe it probably originally dates back into pre-Roman times. From the Norman Conquest of England in 1066 through to the English Civil Wars in the mid-1600s, war and conflict between England and Scotland feature regularly in our local history here in North East England. As a main thoroughfare in those days, Oliver Cromwell’s baggage train, complete with heavy guns drawn by teams of oxen, travelled via Clockburn Lonnen and the Derwent ford on the way to the Battle of Dunbar in the September of 1650. This old road must have been rather wider then than we see it now in the foreground of this photograph.

Coast road by Souter Lighthouse, South Shields in black and white
Coast road by Souter Lighthouse, South Shields

In my final photograph the scene changes from countryside to coast. We often visit this part of the North East coast during the Summer months and enjoy the picturesque walk along the clifftops overlooking the sea. The National Trust now take care of this section of coastline with its fascinating limestone rock formations and the Souter Lighthouse. When our walk is done we make out way out onto the coast road here, halfway between South Shields and Sunderland, and wait for the bus to take us back into the town centre.

I hope you have enjoyed roaming along with me and taking in some of our favourite roadscapes. Do take a look at Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge for more roadscapes this week.

J Peggy Taylor

sprouting acorn in fallen oak leaves in black and white

Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge: Wood

I love natural materials and wood is one of my favourites. When Cee asked us to focus on wood for her Black and White Photo Challenge this week, I knew this was a perfect challenge for me. Wood is such a natural part of my life and I find it is an amazing and beautiful material. Let me share with you some of the ways I enjoy wood in my life.

The entire lifespan of wood, from tree seed to decayed wood, is a story of life-giving processes and for me these processes provide endless inspiration. The sprouting acorn I used to open my post is for me a symbol of the birth of something new, perhaps a new project or venture that I want to nurture and grow to achieve its aims.

Sunlit woodland in black and white
Sunlit woodland in black and white

We live surrounded by woods and walk there often, so we experience all of the natural world’s seasonal variations that woodland has to offer. One of the many pleasures of a woodland wander is wending our way homeward along the old railway with the afternoon sun of early Autumn filtering through the trees, casting lengthening shadows across our path. The wooden bench at the edge of the track offers the opportunity to sit and take in the calming atmosphere of the wood.

fallen oak branch in black and white
Fallen oak branch and wooden fence

The wilder weather of recent years has taken its toll on trees in many places, including here in our woods. This substantial limb from an oak tree has been ripped away by the wind and now lies on the edge of the horse field. Fallen timber provides an amazing habitat for a whole array of creatures. The process of wood decaying is helped very much on its way by the many mini-beasts that live on dead wood. The wood of the oak branch may be dead, but it is still teeming with life.

working in wood in black and white
Working in raw wood – shaping a tenon on an ash pole with the axe

As well as walking in woods, we also enjoy working with wood. My son is shaping a tenon on one end of an ash pole as part of his pole lathe project last year.

 turned wood candlesticks in black and white
Learning to turn wood – some early candlesticks

When the pole lathe was completed, it was time to practice turning green wood. The candlesticks may not quite be a ‘pair’ in the traditional sense, but they did demonstrate a certain level of success and dexterity with the turning chisels. I love the way wood turning brings out the grain and other points of interest in the wood.

hand carved spoon in black and white
Cherry wood hand carved spoon

I was delighted to receive this hand carved spoon in cherry wood from my son as a Christmas present a couple of years ago. The carving has revealed the varying tones in the cherry wood. This wooden spoon has a special role in my utensil jar as my morning porridge-stirring spoon.

Decaying log monster in black and white
My Decaying Log Monster complete with fungi ‘teeth’

I laughed when I first loaded this image onto my computer. While I was out in the beechwood composing the shot, I never noticed the grinning monster. I only saw the sunlight picking out the rough textures in the decaying log that contrasted so well with the smooth fungi growing on the wood. I hope it makes you smile too.

If you too delight in wood, take a look at Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge this week for more inspiring wood images.

Cee's Black and White Challenge Featured Blogger Award

J Peggy Taylor