Tag Archives: color

Bluebells in woodland

The colour Blue for Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge

I decided to look for the colour blue in different seasons for Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge this week.

For my header image I chose glorious wild English Bluebells, blooming in our beechwoods in May. For me, blooming Bluebells are the sign that Spring has really sprung.

Thinking about the colour blue made me ponder on the way the light changes at different times of year. I always notice this when I’m photographing locations that I visit often. I find the blue of the sky varies with the season and the prevailing weather conditions.

Blue sky and blue sea
Blue sky and blue sea

The sky in this image is for me the classic deep blue of an English Summer’s day – definitely a day to be down by the deep blue sea.

Blue sky and a blue hat
Blue sky and a blue hat

Our blue skies in Winter are often a much paler blue than in Summer, especially when it is snowy too. A warm blue wooly hat was definitely the headgear for this chilly walk in the woods.

A heavy November snow fall
A heavy snowfall in November coloured the late afternoon with a snowy blue-grey gloom

This is a strangely atmospheric shot I have shared before. The sky was covered in heavy snow clouds and it had snowed heavily all afternoon. The result by 5.30pm was this incredible blue-grey light. We were fascinated by it as we had never seen the like before. It was as if another world had descended out of the sky – I guess, in a way, it had!

Do take a look at what others have chosen for Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge this week on the theme of the colour blue.

J Peggy Taylor

Wonderful Winter Woodlands

Winter walk in woodland

There’s nothing quite like a woodland walk in winter. I love the woods at all times of year, but in winter I think woodland has its own special magic.

There’s always plenty to watch out for as we wander along – and I do mean ‘wander’. Wandering allows plenty of time to absorb the atmosphere and enjoy the intricacies of the natural world.

Leafless trees stand proud in their stark winter beauty.  We notice the different colours of the twigs and branches – some purple, some orange, some green …  and some are actually brown. The golden winter sun adds its own glow, and we see pink reflections on a group of white birch trunks cast from the red larch twigs 40 feet above us.

We notice and name the numerous species of conifer trees as we pass along another path. I remind my son how to distinguish between Scots and Corsican Pine by counting the needles in each tuft.

We see the recent winter rain has turned a normally-languid-stream into a torrent, gushing on its busy way through the culvert under the road.

The next path we take is a real woodland path, carpeted with last year’s leaves and punctuated at frequent intervals by another winter woodland favourite of mine … mud!  Mud, mud, glorious mud! We squelch through some patches but decide to edge around the larger swamps where the ooze looks to be of a more dubious depth.

When we reach the pond, it looks oddly flat without its reeds, rushes and waterside flowers. We spot a few pond snails but most of the pond’s inhabitants will be resting safely in the silt at the bottom.

We noticed a number of trees with broken limbs as we walked today. The weather has certainly reminded us of its power this winter – wind and water have both caused a fair amount of damage and misery here in the UK. We’ve been lucky and have got off fairly lightly up here in the hills.

Our homeward wander takes us along one of our regular and well-known paths.  We watch the squirrels chasing through the undergrowth before darting suddenly up another tree. One sits motionless by an oak tree only a few metres away from us. We watch, the squirrel sits – we move on first.

sun and sky reflection in muddy puddle

Again we enjoy the beautiful golden winter sunshine … and more mud! The puddles in the railway cutting are full of blue sky and pink clouds overlaid with dark reflections of the winter trees.

Then, wending our way homeward, we spot a promise of Spring – flowering alder catkins.  My son took this quick shot of the catkins against the setting sun – beautiful.

Alder catkins in flower