Tag Archives: dahlias

Flowers for Friday: Dahlias

Dahlias are one of my favourite flowers. I look forward to their colourful blooms in the garden throughout the summer, bursting out of their large button-like buds.

Dahlias, front and back

I love the way the sun lights up both the crimson dahlia behind and the sunburst dahlia in front. I also love the way the light creates a fascinating green speckled shadow from the old green bottle that I chose for these flowers.

Peggy

Cee's Flower of the day banner

Nature’s home

A jar of bright and colourful dahlias
A jar of Summer – bright and colourful Dahlias

I’ve spent the morning browsing seed catalogues and seed merchants websites, dreaming again of sunny days and Summer flowers … To be fair, our weather hasn’t been too wintry so far this Winter, though the wind has been rather wild this weekend.

As I’m browsing, I am also thinking about my New Year’s Resolution … to do whatever I can for our beleaguered planet. In choosing the flowers I will grow for Summer 2020, I intend to consciously choose varieties that actively support garden wildlife. I’m looking at nectar-rich blooms to feed our VIPs (Very Important Pollinators) – bees and hoverflies, butterflies and moths. But I am also looking ahead to the end-of-season seedheads that will enrich the diet of birds visiting the garden for food as the Autumn and Winter draw on.

Comma butterfly in sunshine
Comma butterfly

Usually in the vegetable patch I am looking to keep most animals out – especially rabbits.But one animal I would love to encourage into the garden is one of my very favourite creatures, the hedgehog. And I know I am not the only one. Here in the UK there are now a whole lot of hedgehog supporters … over 620,000 of us on Hugh Warwick’s petition to Help save Britain’s hedgehogs with ‘hedgehog highways’!

hedgehog eating on a road near a car
Endangered species – hedgehog

Hedgehog highways are a very simple idea, but hugely important for hedgehogs. One of the main reasons that hedgehogs have become so scarce in the UK is because we keep fencing off more and more bits of the landscape into smaller and smaller pieces.

The ‘hedgehog highways’ petition has been seeking to bring housing developers onboard to make sure that new housing is hedgehog-friendly. Of course, it is not only new housing that needs to be hedgehog-connected. The more of our gardens that are connected, the better for hedgehogs. Our hedgehogs only need a 13 cm hole in the bottom of a fence or garden wall that allows hedgehogs to move freely between gardens so they can find food or find a mate. (That’s about the size of a CD … if you remember those 😉 )

If you’d like to join the growing band of hedgehog supporters, doing your little bit for hedgehogs, you might like to take a stroll down Hedgehog Street to find more about Britain’s favourite animal. There’s an interactive map too, where you can log sightings of hedgehogs (now also available as a phone app, which is very handy).

Whether it’s bees, butterflies, birds, hedgehogs, or any of the other creatures with which we share our gardens, I’ll be looking to incorporate ideas on gardening for wildlife and there are plenty of ways of “Giving Nature a Home” over on the RSPB’s website too.

Peggy

First flowering dahlia

Dahlia delight!

I love dahlias. They’re definitely one of my favourite Summer garden flowers. I’m often admiring Cee’s photos of beautiful dahlia blooms over at Cee’s Photography. In my small back yard, I don’t have enough space to grow the tall varieties of dahlia, but this year I decided to sow a few pots of dwarf dahlias. I tried this a few years ago, but that Summer was a bit of a washout and the dahlia flowers only grew to the size of large coin.

This year, as part of making more use of the vertical space in my yard, I have my dahlia pots carefully balanced on the new plant shelf, so the plants can catch more of any Summer sunshine that comes their way. I’ve been watching with hopeful anticipation as my dahlia plants have grown on and developed their first flower buds, despite our largely cool and windy weather so far this Summer. Then, on Thursday this week I was delighted to see the first dahlia bud had burst open to reveal its sunny radiance.

J Peggy Taylor

Hazel and willow basket planter with yarn bombing

Yarn bombing and willow weaving in my yard: gardening meets craft

This Spring I’ve been building on my back yard gardening ideas from last year but to make sure there’s always colour in my yard – regardless of whether the plants thrive or fail – I’ve also gone in for a bit of yard yarn bombing this growing season too.

I’ve tidied up the wild crochet jute and willow garden screens that I made for my Sweet Peas last year and turned them into slightly neater, but still very rustic, willow arches.

Willow garden screen rustic arch
Rustic willow garden screen ~ now an arch

This Summer the willow garden screens are going to support the nasturtiums I have sown in their fabric growbags in some of my upcycled air-pruning plant pots. The fabric growbags and air-pruning plant pots have been made the same way as last year.

Nasturtiums in air pruning plant pots
Nasturtiums in air pruning plant pots

If you’re interested in seeing how I made these upcycled air-pruning plant pots you can see the process here and here.

Keeping with the rustic woven willow theme, I’ve added a large basket planter on the outside wall of my yard, overlooking the street.

Willow Garden Screen Arch and Hazel rod basket frame
Willow arch garden screen and hazel rod basket frame

Hazel plant basket frame with coloured yarn ties
Hazel plant basket frame with coloured yarn ties

The basket frame is made from green hazel rods, carefully bent around into an oval shape and fastened with some brightly coloured crochet chains. I added some thinner willow rods that I had to hand to make the top half of the basket. I plan to finish off the weaving with some green willow rods at some later time.

I then lined the basket planter with a sliced-open empty plastic compost sack and I filled up the basket with a soil and potting compost mix. I used some soil to create weight in the base of the basket and also because the soil will help to retain water better than just potting compost alone. My old-fashioned ‘Johnny-jump-up’ violas had grown on well from sowing at the end of March and were just beginning to flower when I planted them out into the new hazel and willow basket planter on my back yard wall. I do think the violas look lovely with their little purple faces nodding in the breeze.

Johnny-jump-up violas flowering in rustic basket planter
The Johnny-jump-up Violas in their rustic basket planter

With so little growing space, I’ve gone further overboard with vertical gardening this year in my back yard gardening, with a new plant shelf to take more advantage of the fence area that sees plenty of light and sunshine.

Yarn bombing plant pots - header
Pots of dahlias and irises on the plant shelf with their colourful yarn plant pot slings

This new plant shelf is now home to pots of dwarf dahlias, which are growing on well since I potted up my seedlings, and some irises that don’t seem to be growing on too well at all just yet. To secure the pots onto the shelf, I devised a strong crochet plant pot sling and crafted these in different colours to give this new growing area an instant colour splash.

First dahlia bud
First dahlia bud

As I was watering my pots yesterday, I was excited to see the first dahlia flower bud appearing on one of my plants … I will be watching and waiting – what colour will it be!

J Peggy Taylor