Tag Archives: street photography

Here’s a Clever Camera Gadget for your Mobile Phone!

Do you like taking photos with your mobile phone? My eldest son is a photographer, graphic artist and all-round general geek. This week he shared this rather clever camera gadget idea:

“Vyu360™ A revolutionary mobile accessory & companion app that enables your smartphone to easily capture and share 360°media”

I say ‘idea’ because currently the Vyu360™ is on Kickstarter and its inventor, Alexis Fernandez, is seeking backers for his project.

Alexis Fernandez calls his Vyu360™ “immersive 360 media for everyone”.

Vyu 360 - Alexis Fernandez

My son says this camera gadget is useful not only for taking VR-viewable photos and videos, but also for generating environment maps for 3D graphics work where you need to create a 360 degree spherical projection. He thinks it may have some limitations but would still be good for basic rough maps for visualisation or getting an idea of an environment before you shoot a real HDRi with a mirror ball.

I think it looks like you could have a lot of fun shooting street photography with it too.

So for all you mobile phoneographers, camera gadget geeks or 3D video game developers – here’s a Kickstarter you might like to take a look at, the Vyu360™ by Alexis Fernandez

… but you’ve only got a few days left to join the fun!

J Peggy Taylor

European Parliament saves Freedom of Panorama

Nico Trinkhaus #saveFoP
Save the Freedom of Photography!

Do you remember this image?

Last week I posted about the European Parliament’s crazy idea that would have outlawed much of street, travel and architectural photography in Europe.

I can now happily report that there was an outbreak of common sense yesterday at the European Parliament.

“After handing over the half a million signatures on Wednesday, the parliament voted yesterday with a big majority against any restriction of the Freedom of Panorama!” Nico Trinkhaus on Change.org

Julia Reda, the MEP who was supporting our campaign to save Freedom of Panorama from Euro-meddling, was overwhelmed by the response to the petition. She said:

“the petition has changed the debate in the parliament considerably and a lot of the parliamentary groups that originally voted for a restriction of Freedom of Panorama are clearly changing their mind about this.” Julia Reda MEP

The change of heart in the European Parliament was so complete, the French MEP, Jean-Marie Cavada, who had introduced the proposed legislation amendment to end our Freedom of Panorama, even asked members to vote against his own amendment!

Commissioner Günther Oettinger of the European Commission said that they “don’t intend to restrict the Freedom of Panorama”. He said:

“what you can see with your eyes as a citizen, on public places and streets in Europe, you should be allowed to also photograph it with a camera.”
Günther Oettinger of the European Commission

So that’s a successful outcome? Almost. This outcome was certainly a win for people power, but we must not forget the whole reason Julia Reda initially brought up the issue of Freedom of Panorama for photographers in Europe. France, Italy and other European countries still do not currently enjoy Freedom of Panorama. It is hoped the European Commission will now take on board the strength of feeling on this issue and look at bringing Freedom of Panorama to all European countries.

Thank you to everyone who supported our Freedom of Panorama! 😀

J Peggy Taylor

“On 9 July 2015, the European Parliament might destroy photography.”

Nico  Trinkhaus #saveFoP
Save the Freedom of Photography!

Have you heard about this attack on photography?

The Freedom of taking photos in public places is under attack. Until now, in most countries in Europe you were safe to take and publish photographs that are taken from public ground – This is called Freedom of Panorama. When you were on vacation, you could take a photo from the London Eye and share it with your friends on Facebook*. If someone wanted to pay you for using this photo, that was okay as well. But this is about to change and may destroy photography as we know it.

Save the Freedom of Photography – Change.org Petition to European Parliament

When news of this Change.org petition dropped into my inbox, my first thought was, “It’s not April 1st is it?” It really did sound quite mad. However, when I read on, it seems that bureaucratic trouble-making was seriously at work here.

Julia Reda, a Member of the European Parliament from Germany, had highlighted that whilst in most European countries the Freedom of Panorama for photography is enshrined in law, in some other European countries, such as France and Italy, there is no Freedom of Panorama law. Through her position as a Member of the European Parliament, Julia Reda was seeking to address this situation. Freedom of Panorama allows anyone to take, publish and sell photographs of public buildings or structures provided they are taken from areas that are open to the public.

However, the current draft amendment for a new European Union law on this issue has turned Julia Reda’s plan on its head. Instead of providing for Freedom of Panorama for photography in a few more countries, the draft law seeks to take this freedom away from everyone! As Nico Trinkhaus has said in the text of his Change.org petition, if we allow this law to be passed, street, travel and architecture photography would effectively be killed stone dead. *Julia Reda has pointed out, you could not even privately upload your photos to Facebook without seeking the consent of the relevant architect, as uploading grants Facebook a license to use the photograph commercially.

When I read this last part, I was just wondering how the European Parliament proposes that people might make contact with architects who are no longer with us … when my son sent me a link to Wikipedia –

“Absence of full Freedom of Panorama means we can’t illustrate Wikipedia properly.”

Freedom of Panorama in Europe in 2015 – Wikipedia

W-h-A-A-A-t! Imagine life without Wikipedia … no, I can’t either.

I hope you will agree with 190,000 of us that this European Parliamentary madness must be challenged. Please take a look at the petition that Nico Trinkhaus has put on Change.org. If you are in the EU, you can also help by writing to your MEPs. Here in North East England, our Labour MEPs have said on their website:

“This amendment is a bad proposal and as MEPs we’re working to make sure it’s rejected:”

Labour MEPs for the North East – Freedom for Commercial Photographers

#saveFoP

Thank you.

J Peggy Taylor