Tag Archives: what is a jumper

Holey Woolly Jumper in need of mending

New craft project: Mending a woolly jumper

When should a woolly jumper be classed as ‘worn out’? Wool is an amazing natural fibre. It really is very resilient. But, whatever the fibre, wear and tear on a garment can take its toll. That’s where my jumper’s at right now – gardening, woodwork, blackberry-picking and countless other outdoor adventures have all left their marks. It was time to consider my jumper’s future.

‘… but, hang on a minute!’ I hear you ask. ‘What do you mean, a ‘jumper’?’
Oh, dear! There’s our good old English language again, confusing people!

Being from northern England, when I say ‘jumper’, I mean a long sleeved garment that you pull over your head and wear over the top of a shirt to keep warm. Depending on where you live, you may call it a ‘sweater’, or a ‘pull-over’ or even a ‘jersey’! Don’t you just love English – why have one word when you can have at least four different words for the same garment?! 🙂

My well-worn woolly jumper in need of some mending
My well-worn woolly jumper in need of some mending

You may be casting your eyes over this threadbare garment and thinking, ‘Isn’t it time that sad excuse for a sweater was recycled or maybe consigned to a dog basket?’
‘OH-H-H NO-O-O!’ I’d cry! ‘I am very attached to my red woolly jumper!’

I admit, my poor old jumper is well-worn, but I believe there’s life in that old woolly yet! So, to improve its aesthetic qualities – and to reduce its ventilation qualities 😉 – I have decided to give it a pre-winter make-over. I’m going to share the process as I go, so if you too have a well-loved woolly garment in need of some ‘ventilation reduction’, feel free to glean some tips and tricks.

I started by taking a close look at the parts of my jumper that were showing serious signs of wear. From my analysis I then came up with a to-do list.

Mending a Woolly Jumper - my to-do list
Task 1 of my new craft project: make a plan

When I examined my jumper, I found there were four holes of varying sizes and each has a ‘ladder’ run (where the knitting has come undone) that will need attention too. The lower edge of the jumper is looking quite frayed in places, so this will also need remedying.

My next task is to consider the yarns and methods I will choose to mend my woolly jumper. I have previously darned a hole in my jumper. The darn remains solidly intact, but the hole has subsequently extended to one side of the darn. For this renovation project, I am currently contemplating creating patches and am trying out some ideas to see what I prefer. I will post more on this thrifty mending project soon.

J Peggy Taylor