Tag Archives: willow

hands hooking the yarn for single crochet stitches

Craft a Willow and Hemp Curtain Ring

I’m in a bit of a willow and hemp phase at the moment. Willow needs little introduction. There are many species of willow (Salix)growing in many parts of the world, and varying in shape and size. As it is quick growing and pliable, willow has long been grown as a basketmaking material. This week I have been discovering myself a little of how wonderfully versatile a material it is for basketmaking, but now I am also experimenting with making it into other forms.

This particular experiment involved making a natural ring and then crocheting a binding around it. The ring is made with a 60cm/24 inch fine willow rod simply coiled around to form a ring about 7cm/3 inches across.

Materials needed to make the curtain ring
Materials needed to make the curtain ring

To make the crochet binding I used some spare hemp yarn I had left over from another project. The hemp I am talking about here is agricultural hemp. Agricultural hemp, like willow, is another wonderfully versatile material. It is also truly environmentally friendly and I believe deserves a much bigger role as one of the sustainable solutions we need for an ecologically sound future.

Hemp yarn is soft and strong. The hemp yarn I am using in this project is a beautifully rich deep terracotta. The yarn is hand-coloured but is also colour-fast, making it washable. Another aspect I particularly love about this yarn is its lustre. The natural hemp yarn has not been bleached as part of its processing, so it retains its natural shine, allowing the light to pick up on highlights in a finished piece.

The curtain ring I am making in this tutorial is experimental at this stage, but I thought I’d share the idea with you. However, I have made similar willow curtain rings without a binding and they are certainly still giving good service a year later.

You can find my tutorial (with photos) for making the willow and hemp curtain ring here on its own page.

The finished willow and hemp curtain ring
The finished willow and hemp curtain ring

You will notice the ring is neither flat nor rounded, but rather undulates as it follows the thicks and thins of the willow base. The crochet stitches will be shorter or longer to accommodate the variations. I quite liked this. I think this gives the curtain ring more character and also the undulation will play well with the lustre of the hemp yarn as the light reflects.

J Peggy Taylor

First Base complete

On reaching First Base in a new craft

One of my crafting ambitions of 2014 is to learn basketmaking. As my main interest is working in hedgerow materials I’ve been avidly studying a very useful book I discovered by Georgia Crook, a professional basketmaker and tutor in Scotland. The book is simply entitled “Basketmaking” but its focus is on using hedgerow materials as well as giving a clear and practical introduction to the basics of this ancient craft.

So far I have been practising some of the real basics – such as cutting slypes and making slaths. If you are thinking I’ve started talking a different language, to an extent you are right. One thing I quickly learned was that it is important to get to grips with the correct terminology in this craft. A slype is an angled point cut with a knife on the end of a rod of willow or other basket material. A slath is the neat cross-over of sticks that make the centre of a basket base.

Slath for First Base
A slightly shaky version of my slath – with two slypes in the near foreground

Today I moved on from slath-making and started weaving, or pairing to be precise. Pairing is the the type of initial weaving that holds the slath sticks in place.

Pairing weaving in progress around the slath
Pairing weaving in progress around the slath

I finished up with a relatively round basket base 15cm (6 inches) wide, though I did learn a few things along the way. I learned that the first pairing weavers need to be really quite thin to make working neatly possible and that my ready-cut oddments of green willow are reaching the point of needing soaking before they are going to be workable.

I also learned that basketmaking is an ideal craft for a chilly day – it certainly kept me warm as I worked my slightly-too-chunky weavers around the slath.

First Base complete
My completed First Base

I was fairly pleased with my first attempt at a basket base and I am now inspired to try my hand at the the next stage, the “upsett” – I’m sure that will be another story.

J Peggy Taylor